Real Estate for Parents: Choosing the Right Home for Your Family

Posted By on Sep 24, 2013 | 0 comments

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Guest post written by Tre Pryor, an Internet-veteran turned tech-savvy, Louisville real estate advisor and realtor with ReMax Champions.

When you are choosing the right home for your family, there are a number of additional factors to consider.

There a great number of variables that go into finding that “perfect home.” Of course there are the tried and true factors like number of bedrooms/baths, overall square footage, lot size, etc. But this list usually includes 5 or more must have items. Then, it’s the realtor’s job to find the best possible matches for his client to view in person.

Along those same lines, it’s very important for families with children to be proactive in planning for the future. Kids have different wants and needs than adults and many times those aren’t included in the house hunting search criteria. What follows are some possible factors that parents with children may want to consider when looking at potential homes for their families.

Research the Schools

A good number of my real estate clients are relocating to Palo Alto Ca, and share with me that one of their highest priorities is “good schools.”

There are a number of great websites devoted to analyzing schools. A few to check out:

There’s a wealth of information out there… take advantage of it!
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Friends in the Neighborhood

Kids love to have fun, right? What’s more fun than playing with other kids?

One factor that parents with kids should consider when comparing homes is the neighborhood.

What kind of people do you seen when driving through the community? Do you notice a good number of playground sets and basketball goals? Is there a neighborhood pool or playground?

Your Realtor cannot lead their clients to or away from a particular neighborhood because of the Fair Housing laws. So it’s generally best to see firsthand for yourself the makeup of each community you are considering.

Yards, Basements or Both

Without a doubt, your children will want some place to play, some space of their own. Bedrooms are great for sleeping but not for passing the football. That’s where backyards come in! Compare the backyards (or possibly sideyards) of your favorite properties to see which one best fits your family.

Maybe your children are more cerebral and would rather play indoor games with their friends. Does the home have a basement? Is it already finished and ready for your kids?

After a busy day of work, when all you want to do is unwind, wouldn’t it be better for your kids to have a space of their own?

Doubling Up Bedrooms

This might strike you as odd but for centuries, children have shared bedrooms with their siblings because home sizes were much smaller. Sometimes the whole family slept in the same room!

Consider if doubling up two of your children in one bedroom might be a good fit for your family. Brothers and sisters build relationships at home and can learn to live and share with one another.

Family Dinners

In this day and age, life moves fast. Yet, report after report finds that families who eat dinner together are stronger and healthier than those who don’t.

When looking at prospective homes, look at the space where dinners might take place and see if that would be the right match for your family. Some eat-in kitchen may only have space for a 4-seat table and perhaps a large dining room off the kitchen would be worthwhile.

 

Mom and Dad will almost always get their wants communicated during the house hunting process. But choosing the right home for your family should include all the members of your family.

Create a plan, share it with your realtor and get out there! Interest rates are on the rise so buying now could save you a great deal of money rather than waiting.

 

 

 
 
 
 

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